FOR ADVISORS
Value of innovative medicines and vaccines

Investment in innovative medicines helps to achieve higher productivity and an increase to your bottom line, by:

  • decreasing presenteeism and absenteeism
  • increasing quality of life
  • reducing disability
  • reducing hospital stays and physician visits
  • preventing costly downstream complications

A study looking at the role of pharmaceuticals in reducing health and societal costs found that:

  • Every dollar spent on innovative prescription medicines generated two dollars in health and other social benefits.
  • Encouraging development of new drugs can reduce overall health care spending.
  • Pharmaceutical innovation boosts the economy by improving workplace health and productivity.

(Source: Conference Board of Canada, 2013)

Another study looking at the value that specialty pharmaceuticals brings to employers and beyond found that:

  • Dollars spent on high-cost, specialty medications treating 3 chronic diseases (Rheumatoid Arthritis, Crohn’s, and Multiple Sclerosis) generate a direct return on investment to the employee’s plan-sponsoring employer, as well as indirectly to other employers, to the economy, and to the health care system.
  • Those benefits include reduced productivity losses, reduced disability costs, reduced need for caregiver resources, and reduced use and costs of healthcare resources.
  • The estimated benefits ranged from $6,600 to $17,000 per year, on average. But this does not include other intangible benefits like the ability of employers with a comprehensive and competitive benefit plan to recruit and retain employees.

(Source: Conference Board of Canada, 2016)

Chronic Disease

Chronic diseases are the number one problem in the workplace, according to Greenshield’s April 2016 Inside Story.

  1. 3 out of 5 Canadians older than 20 have a chronic disease and 4 out of 5 are at risk of developing one (Source: PHAC 2014)
  2. There were an estimated 2.7 million Canadians living with diabetes in 2010 and that number is expected to rise to 4.2 million by 2020 (Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 2013)
  3. Costs associated with treating diabetes was estimated at 12.2 billion in 2010 and projected to rise to 16.9 billion by 2020 (Source: AstraZeneca, Great-West Life, Cubic 2013)

Sanofi Canada’s 2015 Healthcare Survey found that 45% of employees reported they’d been diagnosed with a chronic disease such as diabetes, arthritis, and depression. When high blood pressure and high cholesterol were included, that number rose to 56%. Among those 55 and older, a staggering 78% reported a chronic disease.

Chronic diseases are also responsible for the majority of prescription medicines in the workplace. In fact, it represents almost 90% and 95% of drug use for 50s and 60s age groups, respectively. More than 70 per cent of drug plan costs are by the 35 to 65 age group, according to the Greenshield June 2015 Inside Story. Chronic disease also takes its toll on our economy. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, chronic disease consumes “67% of all direct healthcare costs, and costs the Canadian economy $190 billion annually – $68 billion of which is attributed to treatment and the remainder to lost productivity.” (note, productivity losses in the public agency figures do not include productivity losses due to presenteeism).

According to a report by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, “90% of type 2 diabetes, 80% of coronary heart disease, and one third of cancers could be prevented by healthy eating, regular exercise, and by not smoking.”

Spotlight on mental health

Chronic diseases are the number one problem in the workplace, according to Greenshield’s April 2016 Inside Story.

  1. 3 out of 5 Canadians older than 20 have a chronic disease and 4 out of 5 are at risk of developing one (Source: PHAC 2014)
  2. There were an estimated 2.7 million Canadians living with diabetes in 2010 and that number is expected to rise to 4.2 million by 2020 (Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 2013)
  3. Costs associated with treating diabetes was estimated at 12.2 billion in 2010 and projected to rise to 16.9 billion by 2020 (Source: AstraZeneca, Great-West Life, Cubic 2013)

Sanofi Canada’s 2015 Healthcare Survey found that 45% of employees reported they’d been diagnosed with a chronic disease such as diabetes, arthritis, and depression. When high blood pressure and high cholesterol were included, that number rose to 56%. Among those 55 and older, a staggering 78% reported a chronic disease.

Chronic diseases are also responsible for the majority of prescription medicines in the workplace. In fact, it represents almost 90% and 95% of drug use for 50s and 60s age groups, respectively. More than 70 per cent of drug plan costs are by the 35 to 65 age group, according to the Greenshield June 2015 Inside Story. Chronic disease also takes its toll on our economy. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, chronic disease consumes “67% of all direct healthcare costs, and costs the Canadian economy $190 billion annually – $68 billion of which is attributed to treatment and the remainder to lost productivity.” (note, productivity losses in the public agency figures do not include productivity losses due to presenteeism).

According to a report by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, “90% of type 2 diabetes, 80% of coronary heart disease, and one third of cancers could be prevented by healthy eating, regular exercise, and by not smoking.”

Medication adherence

Chronic diseases are the number one problem in the workplace, according to Greenshield’s April 2016 Inside Story.

  1. 3 out of 5 Canadians older than 20 have a chronic disease and 4 out of 5 are at risk of developing one (Source: PHAC 2014)
  2. There were an estimated 2.7 million Canadians living with diabetes in 2010 and that number is expected to rise to 4.2 million by 2020 (Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes, 2013)
  3. Costs associated with treating diabetes was estimated at 12.2 billion in 2010 and projected to rise to 16.9 billion by 2020 (Source: AstraZeneca, Great-West Life, Cubic 2013)

Sanofi Canada’s 2015 Healthcare Survey found that 45% of employees reported they’d been diagnosed with a chronic disease such as diabetes, arthritis, and depression. When high blood pressure and high cholesterol were included, that number rose to 56%. Among those 55 and older, a staggering 78% reported a chronic disease.

Chronic diseases are also responsible for the majority of prescription medicines in the workplace. In fact, it represents almost 90% and 95% of drug use for 50s and 60s age groups, respectively. More than 70 per cent of drug plan costs are by the 35 to 65 age group, according to the Greenshield June 2015 Inside Story. Chronic disease also takes its toll on our economy. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, chronic disease consumes “67% of all direct healthcare costs, and costs the Canadian economy $190 billion annually – $68 billion of which is attributed to treatment and the remainder to lost productivity.” (note, productivity losses in the public agency figures do not include productivity losses due to presenteeism).

According to a report by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, “90% of type 2 diabetes, 80% of coronary heart disease, and one third of cancers could be prevented by healthy eating, regular exercise, and by not smoking.”